My kids were ignored, heed my warning: Don’t let doctors ignore yours

It took 10 years and a pediatric dentist for me to realize that I was a terrible mother. I fell into the trap of taking the pediatrician at her word. She said they would grow out of these problems, she advised medication for years before I regretfully succumbed, and she said it was all normal.

I’ll admit I started out motherhood at a deficit. I was just shy of 19 years old when I had him and 21 when I had her.

I tried desperately to breastfeed him as an infant, but his birth was fast and my recovery complicated, so we settled for bottle feeding. He was the perfect baby for the first 6 months. Most of the day was eating and sleeping with occasional quiet playtime. The moment we crossed over 6 months was a turn for his health. We battled stomach viruses that seemed to come one after the other, and sleeping became an issue so we co-slept. Which meant he slept while I dealt with blows from kicking and rolling all night.

He turned 2 and one month later he was a big brother. I resented her for coming into our lives and disrupting the time and attention I had for him. Looking back, I know I had postpartum because resent was a mild way of putting it.

With her, I didn’t want to go through the health struggles he has, so we were successful at breastfeeding. Almost without much effort from me. The only vice she had was thumb sucking. Though, admittedly, I was initially thankful for that, as he dropped his pacifier often and I knew I wouldn’t have to deal with her dropping her thumb on the floor of a retail store and wanting to place it back in.

By the time she hit 6 months, she was a loved and well-accepted member of our trio. However, we ceased being a trio by the time she was 3. I met my husband and we made 3 a full family of five.

fam

Insert chaos. He became a kindergartner, she stopped being potty trained and the baby girl S was an around the clock breast-feeder. The baby seemed to never be satiated, was particularly fussy, and had very poor sleep habits.

From kindergarten, teachers told me that they suspected he had issues. He was particularly “energetic” and difficult to “focus.” The pediatrician thought the teachers were too eager to label him with ADHD. At those appointments, I also mentioned that she, at age 3 then, would not sleep through the night, routinely wet the bed, and has numerous accidents during the day. The pediatrician wrote that off too as regression due to baby S.

Acceptable. I could and would wait it out. Only many of those problems never went away. Breastfeeding never got better and ended before I was ready due to a lack of supply. Sleep and fussiness was a consistent problem. He continued to struggle with attention as he moved up in grades.

By the time he was in 5th grade, we expanded from a group of 5 to 6 and we finally succumbed to the inevitable neurology evaluation.kids

All the while, his stomach issues persisted, she continued to amplify her sleep issues with daily bed-wetting, night terrors, and sleepwalking. Baby S, surprisingly thrived as a big sister with no signs of regression but suffered from repeated ear and throat infections. Baby L, struggled with breastfeeding and after two bouts of mastitis, we called it quits. My home was full of love but swimming in health issues. All of which were deemed “normal” and to be outgrown.

His ADHD was officially diagnosed, and after two years of resisting medication, we gave in. The girls maintained sleep issues and cycles of antibiotics for routine infections. I was the mom that would respond with a generic, “good,” when asked how the kids were.

But they weren’t good, I knew it. Motherhood is many things, but devoid of intuition it is not. I wanted help and often Googled in search of it, but nothing helped. How could I stop medicating my kids, buying night diapers for her at 10 years old, and suffering in silence?

The dentist. All I needed was a great dentist. I began working for one and in the interview, she went over airway dentistry in great length and insisted that if I wanted the job I needed to be knowledgeable and an advocate of it. I understood mildly at that moment what it meant, but it wasn’t until my kids were in the chair not long after that I fully comprehended Airway Centered Disorder (ACD).

Every single one of them had issues all directly related to their breathing. His ADHD and digestion problems, her sleep issues and persistent thumb sucking, and S & L’s ear and throat infections and nursing problems. It was always present in their facial features, oral development, and sleep habits. Just never diagnosed.

The restless sleep with tossing and turning at night. The open mouths with a tongue that would rest in between the lips. The dark circles under the eyes and chubby cheeks. The crowded teeth and thumbsucking. The hyperactivity and inability to focus. All of it tells a story of a child with an ACD.

All of it missed by the pediatrician who routinely saw my family for various issues. Yet, all I ever received, in hindsight, was palliative care that kept symptoms down for a little while or no care because they would outgrow the sleep problems.

If the medical field was aware of what so many in the dental field are coming to understand, my children would not have been ignored. S & L would have received tongue tie releases during infancy. He and she would have had a sleep study as toddlers and received treatment for their apnea.

I dove deep into myofunctional therapy, dental appliances, alternative therapies, the impact of diet, and ACD. Parent to parent, after over $10K in continuing education, I know now where I went wrong and I do NOT want you to repeat my mistakes.

4 Steps to Getting Help for Airway Centered Disorder

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1. Monitor everything

How often is your child sick with a routine cold, allergies, or even asthma? How do they sleep at night? Do they mouth breathe? Do you see their tongue frequently when they talk? Are they very picky eaters, have a strong gag reflex, chew loud or messy, eat very fast, or very slow? Do they maintain dark circles under their eyes or baby like chubby cheeks?

To a certain extent, some of these things are okay when seen infrequently. Having an ear or throat infection once or twice a year with the change of seasons is not something to worry over. But having chronic infections is a concern. Note exactly what you experience with your child because it will be important when you are in front of a medical or dental professional.

2. Insist on screenings

While not right, you may experience push-back from your pediatrician or possibly dentist. Not everyone is trained in ACD and it’s impact on the growing child. Inform your pediatrician that you would like a referral to a sleep physician. Ear, Nose, and Throat doctor (ENT) referrals are usually best after a sleep study because it calls the notoriously underpaid ENT to action. Sleep apnea can be fatal in adults and is detrimental to child development, growth, and health. Your child with swollen tonsils or adenoids that prevent nasal breathing can be easily dismissed by an ENT. You should be armed with a sleep study or at least the knowledge that your child does not need further intervention in the medical field.

A diagnosis of no sleep apnea is great, but if you see other signs that your child has an ACD consult with a myofunctional therapist. We treat mouth breathing by establishing proper oral resting habits through exercises and activities.

3. Do your research

Knowledge is power. You cannot change the past and all the things you did not know, but you can impact the future. Establish a strong foundation of research on the impact of ACD on health and development.

Foundation for Airway Health, American Academy of Physiological Medicine and Dentistry, and this Airway Matters blog are all excellent resources to start your journey.

I did a Breathe for Health webinar that breaks down myofunctional therapy and how it can positively impact the effects of ACD. In 45 minutes you come to understand the signs and symptoms and the 3 step process of treatment.

4. Establish your team

Treating an ACD is hardly ever just a one-stop solution. A team can consist of a dentist and a bodyworker. A dentist and an ENT. A sleep physician and myofunctional therapist. A lactation consultant and an ENT. A speech therapist and dentist. There are a number of options and sometimes more than two providers are essential for successful treatment. Know how to proceed once you determine that there is a problem.

Stand your ground

As a parent, there are many different things people will tell you about your child. Your instincts trump it all. You know when something is not right, or feels off. Don’t be passive with their health and accept palliative care, like I did. Take a stand for them and positively impact their health for their lifetime.

Resources

Find journal articles, professional research, peer-reviewed studies and clinical evidence all compiled in one source that support the existence and clinical treatment of ACD here.

If you are a mother of small children or babies, you can intervene early to minimize or eliminate treatment in the future. Read our e-guide Avoid Braces Naturally.

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An airway issue has been identified…now what?

So you had what you thought was going to be a routine dental or medical evaluation and your provider has just informed you that you and/or your child has a breathing or airway issue. You are understandably confused and possibly have been given too much information about a problem you never knew existed.

You have landed in the right place! I will break down the logistics of some information you have been given, possibly give you more you didn’t think of and present you with a to-do list so you know how to proceed.

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All was well and right with the world until that visit. You knew your body and/or your child and there were no words other than healthy to describe you. Yet, a few questions and one exam later knocked down all the blocks in the tower you were building.

Here’s what you should know:

  • Mouthbreathing is ineffective and inhibits your body from functioning optimally. The visible signs that your doctor may have noticed are in the graphic below. These are the tip of the iceberg in diagnostic signs of an orofacial myofunctional disorder (OMD).

    An OMD is an inability to utilize proper oral or facial muscle function. Characterized by over or underutilization of muscles when breathing, masticating (chewing) and/or swallowing.

    myofunctional therapy Cork

  • There is no official way to predict the future health implications of OMDs. Airway issues and dysfunctions have been tied to sleep apnea, asthma, eczema, TMJ disorders, ADHD/ADD, daytime sleepiness, tongue thrust, speech issues, enlarged tonsils/adenoids, snoring, grinding, messy/loud eating, picky eating, slow labored eating, poor dental arch formation, malaligned teeth, poor facial development, anxiety, poor emotional regulation, frequent congestion, and proneness to allergies.
  • Not all tongue ties need to be released. There is a functional and non-functional tongue. The decision for a release should always include a myofunctional therapist, even if just for a consultation. Craniosacral therapists and Osteopathic physicians are also great to consult for eligibility to release. Read more about them below in part 2.
  • We spend 1/3 of our lives sleeping and there is no more critical bodily process than breathing, yet medical and dental schools spend less than 10 hours studying both. With the exception of specialists, medical school graduates are mostly unaware of sleep disordered breathing and orofacial myofunctional disorders. In fact, in most cases where a knowledgeable dental provider indicates an OMD and the patient/parent goes back to their primary care physician, the physician will disregard or dismiss the issue.
  • While there are many possible causative factors for OMDs, the only preventative measures that can be considered are to have newborns evaluated for lip and tongue tie, breastfeed for 1-2 years without regular bottle supplementation, do not introduce a pacifier or take away a pacifier at or before 6 months of age, do not introduce sippy cups, go from breast to regular cup or cup with straw, allow babies to have tummy time, limit baby sleeping in unnatural positioners (walker, rocker, swing, bouncer, carrier), and discourage thumb, finger, tongue or object sucking. The aforementioned measures can help reduce the risk of a child developing an OMD but is not guaranteed. Some hereditary, genetic and otherwise elusive factors are involved.
  • You are not alone. Due to our diets, fast-paced society, and perceived norms many people have OMDs that are undiagnosed. Hard crunchy foods are not the integral part of the diet as it used to be. Caffeine is the stimulant used to power the body and keep it alert and awake, as opposed to adequate oxygenation and sleep. Snoring, painful breastfeeding and needing braces are all considered normal in society, as opposed to signs of airway problems. If you took a walk down a city street and watched carefully, it is a good prediction to say that 70% of the people you pass will have an open mouth and one or more other signs from the graphic above.
  • There are solutions, but you have to be prepared and fully aware of the time and financial commitment that it will require. If you take your steps wisely, you may be able to get some financial help from both medical and dental insurance to help reduce costs in some areas.

Which leads us to

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What on earth do you do with all this new information? How do you apply it and where do you go from here?

The detailed plan

  1. Assemble your team
    1. Dentist- A progressive dentist that specializes in sleep and/or airway dentistry. This dentist does all types of “typical” dental services such as examinations, fillings and preventative care. However, they also evaluate for tongue ties, airway obstruction, screen for sleep issues and utilize orthopedic or orthodontic appliances to expand the airway. They can offer you dental solutions for sleep problems.
    2. Sleep Physician- A sleep specialist can consult with you and determine your need for a sleep study. A sleep study is used to monitor your brain and vital activity while sleeping. The physician will read the results of the study and determine if there were episodes of obstructive breathing or poor sleep quality. In some cases, a sleep study that results in a diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea can warrant your medical insurance to reimburse or pay for dental appliances to expand the airway. A specially trained dentist (general or pediatric) or an oral maxillofacial surgeon can perform releases of tongue or lip ties.
    3. Bodyworker- This team member can feel and manipulate tensions, pains, and dysfunctions in the body. An osteopath is a medical doctor that specialized in osteopathic medicine. These doctors are often recommended by dentists who utilize the orthodontic appliances. Alternatively, a craniosacral therapist works with the cranium, spine and pelvic area. They are certified professionals who have at least 2-3 years of training and clinical experience.  Sometimes trained in orthodontic appliances, bodyworkers understand how to symmetrically balance the growth of the palate with the entire cranium. With tongue ties and other body restrictions or tensions, they may be able to perform treatments to alleviate the tension or manipulate the restriction. In most cases, neither of these professionals are covered by insurances but may qualify for out-of-network reimbursement.
    4. Myofunctional therapist- A myofunctional therapist or orofacial myologist is a speech-language pathologist, dental hygienist or dentist that has pursued additional education and training for the treatment of OMDs. This professional can work with patients to help them establish proper oral resting posture. They are also able to help eliminate noxious oral habits, such as thumb sucking, nail biting or prolonged pacifier use. These professionals are able to assess the functionality of a tongue frenum to determine if the tongue is functionally or non-functionally tied.
    5. ENT- An ear, nose, and throat doctor can evaluate the airway for obstructions. They will determine if the obstruction is capable of rehabilitation without surgical intervention.
  2. Make modifications accordingly
    1. Change the diet. Along this journey, various members of your team will inform you that gluten, dairy, processed foods, and sugar all increase body inflammation. If you have an airway obstruction, the first and easiest change to make is in the diet.
    2. Perform nasal hygiene. Just as you would brush your teeth daily, cleanse the nasal passages with a saline rinse daily.
    3. Try natural solutions. Nasal strips can help to open the nasal passages. Sleeping on your side can help you to breathe better. Eliminate sucking objects (bottles, sippy cups and pacifiers) for young children. Be aware of your mouth posture and close the lips comfortably together to consciously nasal breathe.
  3. Research, Research, RESEARCH
    1. Don’t take everything you hear from your professionals and hold onto it. Process the information internally, and add the wealth of information available online from various professionals. Remember, you are not alone. There are blogs from professionals (like this one), blogs from individuals who chronical their journeys, peer-reviewed journal articles and research available for you to review online.

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Once you know more, you are able to not just do better, but also BE better. It is a long and hard journey, but there is significant light at the end of the tunnel. You are strong enough to complete this journey.

Continue to follow this blog for more helpful posts that may guide you along the way.

Myofunctional Therapy Works: Here’s the proof

There’s much info out there about airway and myofunctional therapy. However, very few compilations of current research and evidence are available for public consumption. Below are journal articles, peer-reviewed studies, clinical evidence and current research for all things airway for your convenience.

Facial soft tissues in mouth breathing children

Forward head posture and mouth breathing

Oral and pharyngeal reflexes: the important role of the tongue

Influence of myofunctional therapy on palatal expansion

Orthodontic relapse without myofunctional therapy

TMD and myofunctional therapy for treatment

The effectiveness of myofunctional therapy on malocclusion

Myofunctional therapy to treat sleep apnea

Myofunctional therapy for severe sleep apnea

Myofunctional therapy as treatment in pediatric sleep apnea

Relationship of snoring and sleep disorders with ADHD

A review of ADHD and sleep

Daytime sleepiness in children with ADHD

Importance of mandibular advancement in sleep apnea treatment / Surgical advancement in treatment of sleep apnea treatment

Tongue tie release as treatment in sleep apnea

Pediatric tongue tie and sleep apnea

Myofunctional therapy and speech

Importance of myofunctional therapy before and after tongue tie release

Adverse affects of mouth breathing on facial growth, health, academics and behavior

Effects of open mouth on sleep

Mouth breathing in allergic children

Myofunctional therapy and CPAP acceptance

Sleep apnea from childhood to old age

 

This list will be continually updated as new research is released

Book List

A comprehensive grouping of airway focused reading can be found on our Pintrest page.

Tongue to Toes: The Whole Body Connection

The human body is an amazing and intricate work of natural art that we will probably study for centuries to come before we ever establish a complete understanding of it. From what we do know from current research and physiologic understanding, it is all very connected.

Every organ, bone, muscle, and tissue is connected in some way to each other. Consider, now, how that connection can impact your body in a negative way.

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Many are familiar with muscles and their connection to the body and movement. Yet, little is ever mentioned of its structural companion, fascia. Fascia is a thin band of connective tissue that envelopes our muscles.

muscle-anatomy

It’s a protective sheath that groups together muscles of similar function and helps to distribute nerves and blood vessels.

While there are 4 layers of fascia that cover certain portions of the body, our outermost layer covers the entire body. Think of it as akin to the skin in encompassing connectivity. If you were to pinch your skin on your arm you may feel the pull or tension of that stretched skin in another area of the arm.

A tongue tie works similarly in fasical pull, as our deep front line fascia connects our tongue in one continuous band of fascia down to our toes.

fascia

It is only in the given imagery above that you can see how a tongue tie (which is restrictive or tight connective tissue band connecting the floor of the mouth to the base of the tongue) can affect breathing, posture, pelvic floor stability, and toe walking. Often a “harmless” tongue tie can be just the clinical tip of the iceberg, masking within the body various linked medical and dental problems.

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Some people do claim to have miraculous feelings of relief or immediate postural improvement. While not unusual, most people do have to wait or accompany a tongue tie release with manual bodywork to assist in fascial strain release. Those pulls by fascia that is holding you together may just be holding you back from real relief.

Don’t let your tongue affect your body negatively. Have your tongue functionally assessed by a myofunctional therapist. Or, learn more about the tongue’s impact on the body, coupled with resources to guide you on your journey from tied to free with our Ultimate Guide for the Tongue Tied.

[Want a closer look at this surgically extracted deep front line with detailed explanation. Get a better view on YouTube.]

The Ultimate Guide for the Tongue Tied

Without fail there are only two responses I get when I notify someone that they have a tongue tie:

  1. No one has ever told me that before
  2. My (or his/her) speech is fine

Given the general lack of information out regarding tongue ties and the linked health concerns, those answers are understandable. However, it is beyond time to break the myths and provide more centralized information that is easy to digest.

A tongue tie may very well be the biggest little thing you never knew you had as it impacts and affects many other parts of the body and is involved in an essential bodily function.

Facts

TMS tongue tie infographic

What if you don’t release

While a tongue tie can very well impact speech, I honestly list speech towards the bottom of reasons to treat a tongue tie. The tongue in it’s proper resting posture should be up against the roof of the mouth for proper breathing, development, and function. A restrictive lingual frenum (string of tissue connecting the floor of the mouth to the base of the tongue) will make proper posture difficult if not impossible. Without release and therapy to obtain proper tongue posture you are risking the possible consequences below.

TMS tongue tie consequence

THE RESOURCES

Frenectomy Tips Before They Snip

A three page guide with the four major steps you should take prior to releasing or considering releasing a tongue tie. Including why pre and post exercising is essential for optimal healing outcomes.

7 Questions You Must Ask Before Choosing A Release Provider

This resource has our list of every essential question you should have answered prior to deciding whether or not this provider is right for you. Not all release professionals are equal in tools, experience, and technique. To make an informed decision you should ask as many questions as possible. Remember, while not a major hospital stay surgery, a tongue tie release is still a surgery.

Tongue Tie Release Checklist and Questionnaire

Accompany resource to our 7 Questions, is this checklist and questionnaire. Use the questionnaire to document what your desires are when it comes to your release experience and healing. Also document the answers to the 7 questions you ask each provider you interview so you can compare responses and make the best decision.

Frequently asked questions

Our YouTube video series, Sixty Second Saturday, answered common questions in less than 60 seconds, like: Frenectomy vs. Frenuloplasty: what’s the difference and Frenectomy healing time: how long.

F.R.E.E. Your Tongue

A self-guided course of myofunctional therapy for those who are unable to work one-on-one with a myofunctional therapist prior to getting released.

 

Relieve congestion and breathe better: Aromatherapy is your breath’s friend

Essential oils are one of the most reliable holistic health options available. There are numerous oils that have benefits that range from physical to mental health improvement.

Inhalation of the oils can be diffused, misted or used as directly inhaled to have the benefits of the oils travel through the body via the airway. Breathing, as you know, is an essential life function and plays a pivotal role in our overall health.

Nothing has been a more critical component to the success of our dynamic myofunctional therapy program then the use of aromatherapy. To establish nasal breathing the passages should be decongested and open to the natural flow of air.

At The Myo Spot, we have our own proprietary blend of oils in a nasal inhaler called the Pivotal Breathing Aromatherapy Inhaler (PBAI). We blend peppermint, eucalyptus, clary sage, bergamot, and lemon; specially blended for decongestion, anti-inflammation, and relaxation.

Peppermint oil has the most potential health benefits and is the base of the PBAI because it decongests, relaxes the muscles of the respiratory tract, and is calming. Combined with eucalyptus oil, which has similar anti-inflammatory and respiratory benefits, it boosts the aromatic effects on the airway. A clear respiratory tract is essential for nasal breathing and can only be maintained with nasal breathing. Mouth breathing will dry the oral cavity, increase bacterial presence and cause inflammation of tonsils/adenoids.

Clary sage is soothing and increases circulation, providing a calm to body and focus to the brain. Bergamot is known for its ability to relieve anxiety and improve mood. Lemon oil is versatile and PBAI utilizes it for its pleasant addition to the aroma and lymphatic drainage. When nasal congestion occurs the sinus cavities and lymphatic system fill, therefore drainage reduces mucus buildup.

In our nature, we always prioritize accessibility and affordability, so today I wish to share my personal recipe for our aromatherapy inhaler. To blend your own supply of our PBAI, you will need a bottle of each 100% essential oil: peppermint, eucalyptus, clary sage, bergamot, and lemon. Using a dropper and a glass bottle, combine 6 drops peppermint oil, 4 drops eucalyptus, and 1 drop of each of the remaining oils. Place the blend in a nasal inhalation tube or a few drops in an aromatherapy diffuser. 

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For convenience, we have our Pivotal Breathing Aromatherapy Inhalers available on Amazon for purchase.

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Whether you blend your own supply or purchase ours, it’s important that you understand the benefits and purpose of the essential oil aromatherapy. So research the efficacy of essential oils and their many uses. I’m certain you are going to discover the profound impact it will have on your breathing, sleep, mood, immunity and much more. It’s the breath’s friend, and natural benefit delivery system, you will wish you knew of sooner.

To read more information about the impact of breathing on health, click here.

The Real Reason Why You Need Braces

Braces have never been and never will be unavoidable. They are not some genetic guarantee you receive upon birth. They are merely the result of oral habits developed from birth; particularly those dealing with the tongue.

After years of braces and the last straw in lost retainers, there’s a reason why your teeth shifted. I hope you’re sitting… because the culprit is not your lost retainer it’s your tongue!

The tongue is now and will continue to reign as the MVP in oral and facial development. Never to be dethroned by any orthodontist or supplier of braces.

It’s a lot to take in. Similarly to discovering that you lived with Santa and the Tooth Fairy you’re whole childhood (i.e. they weren’t real). How is it that the tongue is so powerful that it has this profound impact on the size of the mouth, the shape of the face and the structure of your teeth?

What kind of barn is your mouth?

Imagine a simple drawing of a house without a roof. It has a simple 3-line open rectangle shape. Two lines that meet at a point would complete the roof and create a pointed top, thus creating an almost pentagonal shape. Now imagine a simple drawing of a barn with a nice rounding that completes the roof. Ideally, we want our palates to develop into a barn shape with the nice arched round roof. Our dental arches should form with a U shape.

ushapedarch

The tongue is the foundation for that development. The tongue should naturally sit up along the palate when we are optimally nasal breathing. The constant pressure of the tongue on the arch facilitates growth around the tongue into that perfect U shape.

Our tongue in that sense is the blueprint for palatal development and should fit in the palate without overlapping the teeth.

When the tongue is low in the mouth, we lose the foundation, and like the open rectangle house, without that round support the palate forms a narrow and almost pointed “roof” shape. It would create an A shape, narrow arch with a high palatal vault. This narrows the available space for the teeth and causes dental crowding and often malocclusion. Ashapedarch

The mandible (lower arch) follows the growth of the maxilla (upper arch). So the growth, or lack thereof, in the palate will be matched, in most cases, by the mandible. Those with underbites, or a wider mandible that contains the maxilla (either in part or fully), often have a tongue that is lying low. The pressure from the tongue on the mandible, along with prolonged spacing between the teeth, cause the mandible to extend and restricts the growth of the maxilla further.

Crowding is not new

A narrow arch does not develop overnight. A high palate (roof of the mouth) and tight primary dentition (baby teeth) can predict the formation of a narrow arch and crowding of permanent teeth.

Typically a pediatric dentist may inform you that your child will need braces in the future. However, an orthodontist that is not trained in early intervention orthodontics will most likely not treat this until the child has developed around 12 permanent teeth. Treatment usually involves a palate expander that forcibly pushes the palate open, ideally, to the width it should have grown.

Retention is maintained by a retainer. When teeth “shift back” to some form of malocclusion it is often because the tongue has not maintained that palatal width with the pressure we discussed earlier. Our teeth are in constant motion and with a lack of stability from the tongue, they will gravitate to their position of origin. Granted, if expansion was done, the teeth do not shift back to origination. But they will move out of the alignment established with braces.

TMJ pain that’s hard to swallow

A low tongue posture is often accompanied by a “reverse swallow.” This improper swallow occurs when the tongue thrusts forward either against the teeth or between them to swallow. Every thrust forward causes the mandible to shift backward and compress the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in an unnatural way. Multiple cases of this pressure will compound and affects the longevity and stability of the TMJ. Thus feelings of pain, clicking, and popping occur and cause frustration.

retruded mand

The reverse swallow also creates a long narrow face with a mandible that is recessed or retruded. In profile, this would appear as a lower lip that is not aligned with the upper lip. Even in people whose teeth appear straight, this form of a malocclusion does require braces as well. Over time the way the teeth occlude, or bite together, would cause undue harm to the jaw and discomfort during chewing.

What to do

Establishing proper tongue posture with good habits, early intervention, or myofunctional therapy leads to proper oral development in young children. However, it is never too late to attain proper tongue posture to improve wellness. A wide palate means a wide nasal floor with open passages and greater airway space. Ultimately reducing and/or eliminating the potential for sleep apnea, chronic infections, anxiety, asthma and more.

Contact me to find out how myofunctional therapy can help you with your braces or read our introduction to airway post to discover the many paths to airway health.

Why did my doctor recommend myofunctional therapy?

I guess you thought you were in for a simple visit. A routine visit with a simple diagnosis or the always preferred, confirmation of health. Thankfully, you have an excellent doctor who cares about your whole body and sent you on a wellness path!

There are several reasons why you may have been referred to myofunctional therapy, and several types of providers who do refer.

Who may have sent you and why

Speech Language Pathologist (speech therapist) – refer for speech problems that are not improving due to a tongue tie or tongue thrust. Common referrals include lisps and difficulty with S, L, T, D and N sounds. (*myofunctional therapists that are NOT speech therapists do not treat the speech problem, they treat the tongue posture and speech improves in conjunction with continued treatment with the speech therapist)

Otolaryngologists (ear, nose, and throat doctors)– refer in conjunction with a dentist in their airway team. Typically for those with high narrow dental arches, chronically inflamed tonsils or adenoids, and/or a deviated septum.

Dentists or Orthodontists – refer for tongue thrust, open bite, malocclusion, thumb sucking, high palate (roof of the mouth), narrow arches, mouth breathing, and most commonly in conjunction with braces or oral appliance.

Sleep Physicians – refer for mild sleep apnea and CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure) compliance.

If you do myofunctional therapy…

There is far more to gain from myo then what you may have been referred for. Often times problems you had no idea were associated, can be caused by an orofacial myofunctional disorder (OMD).

The body is one large connected unit with many functioning parts. When there is dysfunction in a muscle, often it leads to the body creating a compensatory use of another muscle to perform the task. For example, when you have a reverse swallow it can cause overdevelopment of your mentalis muscle and alter facial appearance.

OMDs can contribute to numerous problems as can be seen below in the infographic. Myofunctional therapy may be the answer you never knew you needed to problems your healthcare provider referred you for, in addition to other underlying issues.

25 Health Benefits of Myofunctional Therapy-01

Still unsure where to go on this airway health journey? Read start with this beginner’s guide.

Contact us to get started with myofunctional therapy today!